Sri Lanka Brief
NewsUN-Sri LankaSri Lanka accepts 177 UPR recommendations 53 not accepted

Sri Lanka accepts 177 UPR recommendations 53 not accepted

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6. The recommendations formulated during the interactive dialogue listed below have been examined by Sri Lanka and enjoy the support of Sri Lanka:

6.1. Consider ratifying the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aimed at abolishing the death penalty (Uruguay);
6.2. Ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (Poland), (Uruguay), (Denmark);
6.3. Ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (Senegal);
6.4. Accede to the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (New Zealand);
6.5. Ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment as soon as possible (Ghana);
6.6. Upon ratification, implement the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland);
6.7. Consider ratification of the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (Afghanistan);
6.8. Consider ratifying the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (Cote d’Ivoire);
6.9. Ratify swiftly the Optional Protocols to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment as well as the to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (Guatemala);
6.10. Ensure safeguards against arbitrary arrest and torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment and ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (Portugal);
6.11. Continue strengthen its cooperation with Human Rights Council and its mechanism (Myanmar);
6.12. Respond positively to the pending visit requests by the Special Procedures mandate holders (Latvia);
6.13. Continue the process of constitutional reforms, including consideration of a new Bill of Rights that will, amongst others, guarantee the right to life and the right to non-discrimination on any ground (South Africa);2
6.14. Continue the constitutional reform to create a more comprehensive framework for the promotion and protection of human rights (Viet Nam);
6.15. Continue the Constitutional reforms to guarantee the fundamental rights of the entire population, and move forward in the implementation of the reforms as planned in the National Human Rights Plan (Mexico);
6.16. Ensure adequate funding and manpower for the Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka (Philippines);
6.17. Ensure the full alignment of the Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka in accordance with the Paris Principles (Afghanistan);
6.18. Make further efforts to ensure the implementation of its National Human Rights Action Plan (Myanmar);
6.19. Continue its efforts for the passing of the National Human Rights Action Plan and afterwards its implementation (Pakistan);
6.20. Work with the development partners to facilitate the implementation of the National Human Rights Action Plan (Philippines);
6.21. Ensure that adequate resources are invested for the effective implementation of the National Human Rights Action Plan 2017-2021, in particular at the provincial level (Singapore);
6.22. Continue its efforts to implement the national human rights action plan (Sudan);
6.23. Work to ensure that all government agencies and relevant stakeholders are fully aware of the National Action Plan for human rights and effectively implement it for the benefit of all people, especially the most vulnerable groups in the society (Thailand);
6.24. Continue strengthening the integration of human rights in its public policies by strengthening the government agencies at all levels for the implementation of the National Action Plan on Human Rights 2017-2021 (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela);
6.25. Continue its close cooperation with the UN bodies and mechanisms to implement the National Human Rights Action Plan (Azerbaijan);
6.26. Implement the National Action Plan on Human Rights for 2017-2021 (Cuba);
6.27. Ensure the allocation of necessary resources in order to implement measures planned under the National Human Rights Action Plan (Belarus);
6.28. Scale up awareness raising of new policies and legislations to the grass root level (Ethiopia);
6.29. Pursue its initiative to include the subject of “human rights” in its education curriculum as it would facilitate national reconciliation by building trust and confidence in the society (India);
6.30. Extend human rights education to all sectors of the country (Burundi);
6.31. Continue the efforts of addressing any discriminatory laws and practices in line with Sri Lanka’s accepted international obligations (Ethiopia);
6.32. Do more to combat all forms of discrimination, with a focus on vulnerable groups (Senegal);
6.33. Continue efforts to protect and promote the rights of the marginalized and vulnerable sections of the society (Nepal);
6.34. Strengthen measures to promote the right to equality and non-discrimination against any citizen and/or community whatever their origin, age and identity (Plurinational State of Bolivia);
6.35. Take further steps to eradicate all forms of discrimination and violence against minority communities, including women and girls, and implement the recent recommendations in this regard from the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (New Zealand);
6.36. Adopt measures to strengthen the legal framework with the aim of eliminating all forms of discrimination against minority groups in society, based on ethnicity, gender, caste or any other ground (Uruguay);
6.37. Prevent and combat all kind of discrimination, in particular those on the ground of ethnicity and sexual orientation (Italy);
6.38. Ensure respect for the rights and fundamental freedoms of LGBTI persons, by investigating and sanctioning acts of discrimination and violence against LGBTI persons (Argentina);
6.39. Adopt measures to eliminate all forms of discrimination in health care settings, including in the context of HIV/AIDS, while paying particular attention to the specific needs of key populations, including LGBTI persons (Portugal);
6.40. Adopt comprehensive legislation on hate speech and incitement to hatred (Sierra Leone);
6.41. Continue the efforts to combat hate speech (Tunisia);
6.42. Take concrete measures aimed at preventing and punishing the perpetrators of hate speech and incitement of violent attacks against ethnic and religious minority (Namibia);
6.43. Investigate all attacks and hate speech against members of religious minorities, prosecute perpetrators and take steps to prevent reocurrence (Australia);
6.44. Address urgently the intensive use of chemicals in agriculture (Iraq);
6.45. Make progress in the drafting and implementation of policies and measures aimed at attaining Sri Lanka’s sustainable development and overcoming challenges of climate change for the protection and promotion of human rights of its population (Nicaragua);
6.46. Integrate the protection and promotion of human rights in its environmental policies and strategies for response to disasters (Cuba);
6.47. Incorporate climate change considerations into the implementation of the National Human Rights Action Plan (Viet Nam);
6.48. Continue its efforts for the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals at the grass roots level (Pakistan);
6.49. Focus on economic, social and cultural rights as a first step towards achieving programmes within the framework of the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda (United Arab Emirates);
6.50. Continue efforts to ensure the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals for the entire population (Algeria);
6.51. Strengthen the human rights approach in policies to fight against terrorism (Peru);
6.52. Review the anti-terrorist legislation in order to bring it in line with international standards (Estonia);
6.53. Consider to abolish the death penalty (Italy);
6.54. Consider abolishing the death penalty (Timor-Leste);
6.55. Strengthen regulatory and institutional framework to ensure implementation of the Zero Tolerance Policy on Torture, as well as enhancing capacity building on the prevention of torture (Indonesia);
6.56. Strengthen efforts to prevent torture, especially with respect to people under custody by the criminal investigations department, police and military agencies (Islamic Republic of Iran);
6.57. Take all necessary steps to prevent police violence and introduce programs in police forces and enforcement authorities aimed at raising awareness against torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment (Slovakia);
6.58. Establish a solid legislative mechanism to punish all forms of torture and violence committed by the police during investigations in order to get confessions (Madagascar);
6.59. Continue the ongoing process of consolidating democracy and the rule of law in the country (Nepal);
6.60. Continue carrying out the policy aimed at bringing legislation in line with its international human rights obligations, and improving judicial and penitentiary systems, as well as the application of laws in the area of the rights of national and religious minorities (Russian Federation);
6.61. Advance towards thorough and effective implementation of the Convention for the Protection of all Persons from Enforced Disappearance in national legislation, including enlistment of enforced disappearance as a crime in its criminal legislation (Spain);
6.62. Enact legislation making enforced disappearances a crime under national law in accordance with the Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (Sweden);
6.63. Make the Office of Missing Persons fully operational inter alia by appointing well-qualified independent commissioners and allocating sufficient funds (Germany);
6.64. Provide the Office on Missing Persons with sufficient resources and equip the office with highly qualified members to perform its mission independently and effectively (Republic of Korea);
6.65. Publish all reports of previous commissions on enforced disappearances, in particular the Presidential Commission to Investigate Complaints of Missing Persons (PCICMP) (Switzerland);
6.66. Adopt legal provisions to define cases of enforced disappearance as a criminal offence in the national law, fully investigate cases of enforced disappearances and bring to justice those responsible (Slovakia);
6.67. Ensure that all allegations of arbitrary detention, torture and enforced disappearances are impartially and effectively investigated by an independent body (Italy);
6.68. Grant the request of families of victims to get information on the names and places of detention of detained persons (France);
6.69. Continue to avail international assistance for investigating war crimes and human rights training for security forces (Islamic Republic of Iran);
6.70. Guarantee completion of ongoing investigations into abuse committed against civilian population during the civil war (France);
6.71. Ensure that comprehensive measures are in place to thoroughly investigate and provide judicial remedies for cases of violations following the armed conflict (Sierra Leone);
6.72. Continue to investigate, in an independent and impartial manner, all human rights violations committed during the conflict and its aftermath, and to prosecute perpetrators and ensure proper redress to the victims affected, in this regard (State of Palestine);
6.73. Hold security forces and government officials accountable for human rights violations and abuses (United States of America);
6.74. Deepen investigation of cases of human rights violations committed during the conflict, punish the perpetrators and provide adequate reparation to the victims (Argentina);
6.75. Continue efforts to step up psychosocial assistance programs to victims of the conflict according to their needs (Islamic Republic of Iran);
6.76. Fulfil all the commitments made on transitional justice, including through the creation of an accountability mechanism which is credible, victim-centric and supported by international practitioners and through full operationalization of independent and impartial work of the recently established Office of missing persons (Slovenia);
6.77. Establish comprehensive transitional justice mechanism, including operationalising of an Office of Missing Persons, a truth-seeking commission, an Office of Reparations and a judicial mechanism with a special counsel as committed to (South Africa);3
6.78. Ensure that the transitional justice system is finally created (France);
6.79. Expedite the process of reconciliation and transitional justice, including through the commencement of the operation of the Office of Missing Persons, the enactment of the new counter terrorism legislation, as well as the additional release of land to the people in the Northern and Eastern provinces of the country (Thailand);
6.80. Establish an encompassing framework of judicial and non-judicial measures to ensure transitional justice, including the creation of a national mechanism of truth, justice and reconciliation and an office for reparations (Belgium);
6.81. Accelerate the process to establish a transitional justice system that includes an equal participation of women, that relies on personnel trained to deal with cases of sexual violence and violence against women, and whose rulings are transparent and public (Mexico);
6.82. Continue its efforts towards national reconciliation in cooperation with international community, while fully engaging with all stakeholders (Japan);
6.83. Pursue the efforts towards reconciliation and the strengthening of national unity, and to address post-conflict concerns such as the return and resettlement of internal displaced people, and the social rehabilitation and reintegration of former combatants (Nicaragua);
6.84. Continue its efforts leading to national reconciliation (Peru);
6.85. Pursue efforts to strengthen national reconciliation and ensure the achievement of transitional justice (Qatar);
6.86. Continue and step up efforts to promote reconciliation, accountability and human rights, above all through national initiatives such as the national policy on reconciliation (Brazil);
6.87. Take the necessary steps to ensure the speedy creation of a Commission for Truth, a Judicial Mechanism and an Office for Reparations pursuant to the Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 (Ireland);
6.88. Take the necessary legislative steps to establish a Commission for Truth, a Judicial Mechanism and an Office for Reparations as specified in resolution 30/1 (Germany);
6.89. Pursue timely and continued progress in its reconciliation and reform programme in accordance with Resolution 30/1 as adopted by the Human Rights Council (New Zealand);
6.90. Fully implement the commitments agreed to in Human Rights Council resolution 30/1 (United States of America);
6.91. Fully implement its commitments under Human Rights Council resolution 30/1(Australia);4
6.92. Continue making progress in the implementation of the national reconciliation project through the Ministries of National Integration and Reconciliation and of National Coexistence, Dialogue and Official Languages (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela);
6.93. Continue efforts to consolidate national reconciliation as a lasting response to the aftermath of the armed conflict (Algeria);
6.94. Continue to promote national reconciliation by preventing acts of violence and intimidation against religious and ethnic minorities, and by ensuring effective prosecution and punishment of perpetrators (Holy See);
6.95. Promote the rights of and compensation for victims of crimes and witnesses (Egypt);
6.96. Ensure the independence and integrity of the authority and division for witness and victim protection and allocate sufficient funds beginning with the 2018 budget (Germany);
6.97. Strengthen efforts to protect freedom of religion and promote inter-religious dialogue (Italy);
6.98. Ensure that the right to freedom of religion and belief is guaranteed and respected (Madagascar);
6.99. Increase efforts to guarantee and protect freedom of religion and belief in line with its obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Belgium);
6.100. Actively encourage dialogue between various religious groups to enhance interfaith solidarity, to prevent potential violence and the spread of religious hatred (Netherlands);
6.101. Strengthen existing law and practice to guarantee the right to freedom of religion or belief for all citizens and residents, in particular by prosecuting and punishing all cases of religiously-motivated violence (Poland);
6.102. Hold accountable perpetrators of harassment and violence against members of religious minority communities (United States of America);
6.103. Condemn all acts of intimidation of, or violence against, members of religious minorities, and bring all perpetrators to justice without delay (Netherlands);
6.104. Take all necessary measures to ensure the protection of civil society actors and journalists and to investigate cases of threats and attacks against them (State of Palestine);
6.105. Ensure a safe and enabling environment for civil society and human rights defenders (Norway);
6.106. Ensure in line with international human rights the protection of women human rights defenders – including through human rights training of the police – so that they can fully participate in society without fear of harassment or violence (Finland);
6.107. Take measures to adequately protect human rights defenders, to ensure proper investigation into alleged attacks and to prosecute those found responsible (Ireland);
6.108. Continue efforts to combat human trafficking and provide all necessary requirements to ensure the implementation of the strategic plan on this matter (Qatar);
6.109. Continue its efforts to implement the strategic plan to combat trafficking in persons (Sudan);
6.110. Consider introducing legislation requiring businesses to report publicly on efforts to ensure transparency in supply chains, as part of Sri Lanka’s national action plan to combat human trafficking (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland);
6.111. Take measures to provide the victims of trafficking with effective remedy, including compensation and rehabilitation (Armenia);
6.112. Strengthen measures aimed at the full realization of economic, social and cultural rights (South Africa);
6.113. Implement recommendations by relevant treaty bodies such as the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, to end military involvement in commercial and other civilian activities (Austria);
6.114. Continue to promote economic and social sustainable development and poverty reduction, to lay a solid foundation for the enjoyment of all human rights by its people (China);
6.115. Continue to strengthen and reform the social protection system to cover all persons, including those from the most disadvantaged and marginalized groups (Maldives);
6.116. Continue the efforts to combat extreme poverty within the Sustainable Development Goals framework (Morocco);
6.117. Take all necessary measures to reduce poverty (Saudi Arabia);
6.118. Fully implement its Vision 2025, expand existing programmes such as the Gramashakthi People’s Movement, or establish new initiatives where necessary, to boost poverty alleviation efforts and to address regional disparities (Singapore);
6.119. Continue appropriate policies to eliminate poverty in Sri Lanka by 2030 as stated in paragraph 87 of the report (United Arab Emirates);
6.120. Continue to pursue its successful social policies in the fight against poverty, with the aim of increasing the quality of life of its people, particularly the most vulnerable sectors (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela);
6.121. Continue its efforts in alleviating poverty through health, education and housing programmes and in developing enabling legislation to ensure the human rights of vulnerable groups (Bhutan);
6.122. Encourage the implementation of its national policy on poverty alleviation to realise its goals of eradicating poverty in the country by 2030 (Brunei Darussalam);
6.123. Establish a specific programme to produce opportunities for income for women, mainly in rural areas (Honduras);
6.124. Establish a disaggregated database on women heads of households to be used uniformly in welfare and resettlement policies and programmes, including to ensure that women heads of households and internally displaced persons have targeted psychosocial and livelihood assistance, as well as adequate and durable access to housing (Finland);
6.125. Continue to take positive measures to better protect the right of its people to education, health care, employment, housing and food, etc., (China);
6.126. Continue to implement measures to promote infrastructure development and capacity building, especially in the field of health and medical services (Japan);
6.127. Take measures to allocate adequate resources to develop the quality of health and educational services in plantation areas (Islamic Republic of Iran);
6.128. Adopt in line with 2030 Agenda all legislative and political measures as needed to guarantee universal access to sexual and reproductive health, according to the Plan of Action of the Beijing Conference (Honduras);
6.129. Ensure equal access to education of vulnerable people including women, children and persons with disabilities (Lao People’s Democratic Republic);
6.130. Strengthen the democratic control of the defence sector, in particular suspend the involvement of members of the armed forces in economic activities, in order to ensure guarantee of property of citizens, as well as their livelihoods (Switzerland);
6.131. Accelerate the restitution of lands confiscated by the army and set up a satisfactory compensation system (France);
6.132. Consider the review of the land laws in order to address the immediate needs of internally displaced persons (Georgia);
6.133. Take all the necessary measures to significantly increase the process of returning occupied private land back to their rightful owners, with the view of also addressing accusations of land-grabbing (Haiti);
6.134. Set up a genuine policy on protection and promotion of women’s rights (France);
6.135. Intensify measures to advance women’s rights, including vocational training of youth and measures relating to access to justice, and legislative reform, as well as implementation of gender responsiveness at all levels of governance and policymaking (Indonesia);
6.136. Continue efforts to enhance the empowerment of women and the elimination of discrimination and violence against women (Tunisia);
6.137. Fully incorporate the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women into Sri Lanka’s domestic system (Norway);
6.138. Guarantee equality between men and women through an exhaustive review of national legislation (Guatemala);
6.139. Review and repeal discriminatory provisions against women in its domestic legislation (Latvia);
6.140. Consider undertaking a review of domestic laws with the view to guaranteeing equality between men and women, including laws that govern the rights of succession with respect to land permits and grants, and the absence of a minimum age for marriage under Muslim law (Ghana);
6.141. Eliminate discriminatory practice against women in relations to rights to succession, inheritance and possession of land (Spain);
6.142. Review domestic laws that have an impact on equality between women and men, in particular those that govern rights of succession, the disposal of immovable property and the establishment of a minimum age for marriage (Portugal);
6.143. Repeal domestic legislation that discriminates against women, including on rights to succession to land permits and grants, and the disposal of immovable property, as well as to address obstacles to equal participation of women in political, economic and public life (Namibia);
6.144. Continue efforts to address discrimination against women and combat gender-based violence (Lao People’s Democratic Republic);
6.145. Strengthen efforts towards elimination of violence against women (Georgia);
6.146. Pursue all efforts to fight gender based violence (Saudi Arabia);
6.147. Design and implement strategies to tackle sexual and gender-based violence, including addressing related stigma towards victims and survivors, as per the National Human Rights Action Plan, the National Plan of Action for addressing Sexual and Gender Based Violence and the Declaration on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland);
6.148. Criminalise conjugal violence and adopt a comprehensive strategy to prevent and fight against gender violence (Honduras);
6.149. Continue to take measures to end all forms of violence against women and expedite the finalization of amendments to the Prevention of Domestic Violence Act (Maldives);5
6.150. Allocate adequate resources to ensure the continuous and effective implementation of the National Action Plan to address Gender-Based Violence (Malaysia);
6.151. Continuously provide gender sensitive trainings to authorities handling gender-based violence cases (Malaysia);
6.152. Intensify its efforts to investigate allegations of sexual violence by the security forces and ensure that perpetrators are prosecuted and punished (Timor-Leste);
6.153. Protect and promote the rights of women, end sexual violence in conflict and do not allow impunity for such crimes (Egypt);
6.154. Equip all police stations with a women’s desk, private rooms, and sufficient number of female police officers with the view of better ensuring women and girls’ access to justice (Haiti);
6.155. Increase women’s participation in the public and political life and reform laws that discriminate against women (Iraq);
6.156. Continue promoting the participation and empowerment of women in the decision-making process and combat discrimination against their role in the family and society (Libya);
6.157. Continue the efforts to promote and protect the rights of women, and strengthen measures already adopted aimed at enhancing their political participation (Morocco);
6.158. Pursue sustained policies aimed at the promotion of women’s full and equal participation in decision-making at all levels of government (Norway);
6.159. Work on the implementation of the Agenda on Women, Peace and Security so as to ensure effective participation of women in all areas of decision making processes (Spain);
6.160. Enhance participation by women in political and public life and further increase assistance to women heads of households in gaining access to employment and services to improve their socioeconomic conditions (Bahrain);
6.161. Adopt concrete initiatives to eradicate all kinds of discrimination against children, through the empowerment of their rights and fair mechanisms of reparation (Ecuador);
6.162. Adopt special measures to ensure that persons in particularly vulnerable situations, such as children, have meaningful access to the justice system and other complaint procedures (Bahrain);
6.163. Address discrimination against children on the basis of their ethnic origin or economic situation (Iraq);
6.164. Continue efforts to protect effectively women, children, and ethnic minorities’ rights, and combat discrimination they are facing (Poland);
6.165. Prohibit corporal punishment of children in all settings, including at home (Montenegro);
6.166. Continue its efforts for the protection of children and combating child labour (Tunisia);
6.167. Ensure access of persons with disabilities to education, employment, public transportation, health and political participation, and eliminate discriminatory laws and regulations (Mexico);
6.168. Continue allocating adequate funds for welfare programs providing support to persons with disabilities (Azerbaijan);
6.169. Continue with its efforts to increase the number of persons with disabilities employed in the public service (Brunei Darussalam);
6.170. Continue to effectively address issues such as poor access to education and health systems for persons with disabilities (Japan);
6.171. Continue the protection programs and policies of the Tamil population so that they can fully enjoy their rights, particularly economic, social and cultural rights (Peru);
6.172. Give particular attention to the effective participation of the minorities in the decision-taking process, offering equal economic and social opportunities, and to create practices and institutions to ensure that ethnic, linguistic and religious diversity of the country can be fully integrated (Guatemala);
6.173. Accelerate the enactment of the Sri Lanka Employment Migration Authority Act on the protection of migrant workers and their families in line with the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (Indonesia);
6.174. Apply alternatives to detention of irregular migrants, in particular for families and children (Portugal);
6.175. Reinforce its policies to provide asylum seekers and refugees access to education services that are available nationally (Holy See);
6.176. Exert further efforts to ensure return and resettlement of the remaining Internally Displaced Persons (Azerbaijan);
6.177. Strengthen measures to address the needs of people affected and displaced by conflict and seek durable solutions to their displacement (Egypt).

7. The recommendations formulated during the interactive dialogue listed below have been examined by Sri Lanka and have been noted by Sri Lanka:

7.1. Ratify the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty (Montenegro), (Spain);
7.2. Ratify the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Poland);
7.3. Halt the use of the death penalty in all circumstances and take steps towards its abolition, including ratification of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (New Zealand);
7.4. Consider ratifying the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol (Côte d’Ivoire);
7.5. Ratify the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court as well as the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment and establish a National Torture Prevention Mechanism (Austria);
7.6. Ratify the optional protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on a communications procedure, to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Slovakia);
7.7. Ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (Burundi);
7.8. Adhere to and adapt national legislation to the Arms Trade Treaty and sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (Guatemala);
7.9. Ratify the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol (Portugal) (Sierra Leone);
7.10. Ratify the Rome Statue of the International Criminal Court (Slovenia), (Timor-Leste);
7.11. Ratify the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Estonia);
7.12. Adhere to and adapt its national legislation with the Rome Statute (Guatemala);
7.13. Ratify the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and fully align its legislation with all the obligations under the Rome Statute (Latvia);
7.14. Ratify the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention No. 169 of the ILO (Guatemala);
7.15. Ratify the Convention on the Non-Applicability of Statutory Limitations to War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity (Armenia);
7.16. Guarantee that the new constitution clearly and expressly recognize the fundamental principle of the separation of powers, establish checks and balances and guarantee the independence of the judiciary and the courts, while ensuring that all stakeholders have a place at the table when drafting the new constitution (Haiti);
7.17. Consider the creation of a Ministry responsible for acceleration of the implementation of the new National Human Rights Action Plan 2017-2021, developed in 2016 (Côte d’Ivoire);
7.18. Ensure that Constitutional reforms guarantee equal protections, rights and treatment of all individuals, without distinction (Canada);
7.19. Amend its laws that discriminate against women, and decriminalise consensual same-sex conduct (Australia);
7.20. Amend the Penal Code, particularly Sections 365 and 365A to decriminalize consensual same-sex conduct and displays of affection (Netherlands);
7.21. Decriminalize same-sex relations and take concrete measures to combat discrimination and violence against LGBTI community (Brazil);
7.22. Decriminalize same-sex conduct by repealing Sections 365 and 365A of the penal code (Canada);
7.23. Amend the Penal Code, particularly Sections 365 and 365A, to decriminalize consensual same-sex conduct as well as displays of affection (Sweden);
7.24. Modify the criminal code in order to decriminalize consensual sexual behaviour between persons of the same sex, suppress degrading terms that could be used against the LGBTI community and avoid abuse and harassment by police authorities (Uruguay);
7.25. Decriminalise same-sex consensual relationships and to adopt all necessary measures to combat discrimination and violence based on sexual orientation or gender identity, and to guarantee access of the LGBTI people to health services (Honduras);
7.26. End impunity and ensure that perpetrators of incitement to hatred and violence are brought to justice in compliance with international law (Sweden);
7.27. Repeal the Prevention of Terrorism Act and enforce an immediate moratorium on its use; ensure that the draft Counter-Terrorism Act is compliant with international human rights standards (Canada);
7.28. Abolish the death penalty (Australia);
7.29. Take concrete measures to abolish the death penalty (Norway);
7.30. Transform its de facto moratorium on the application of the death penalty into definitive abolition (Portugal);
7.31. Abolish capital punishment, establish a moratorium on all pending executions and commute all death sentences to prison sentences (Slovakia);
7.32. Abolish capital punishment and commute death sentences to prison terms (Holy See);
7.33. Abolish the death penalty, considering that the moratorium on judicial executions has been in place since 1975 (Namibia);
7.34. Ensure, in law and in practice, that all detainees are afforded fundamental legal safeguards from the outset (Holy See);
7.35. Publish a consolidated list of missing persons (Switzerland);
7.36. Take comprehensive measures to ensure that the alleged war crimes and other human rights violations committed during the internal conflict are investigated and prosecuted with the aim to end impunity (Estonia);
7.37. Expedite the ongoing process and establish a clear timeline to establish a truth-seeking commission and an Office on Reparations as well as a special court to investigate allegations of serious human rights violations (Republic of Korea);
7.38. Move with concrete steps – most evidently seen through committed financial resources in the national budget, and appointed experts with concrete mandates – on all four transitional justice mechanisms (The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia);
7.39. Develop a clear timeline and benchmarks for the full implementation of Sri Lanka’s commitments under Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 (Germany);
7.40. Develop a clear timeline and benchmarks for the full implementation of its commitments in Human Rights Council resolution 30/1 (Norway);
7.41. Develop an unambiguous timeline accompanied with a monitoring framework for the full implementation of its commitments under Human Rights Council resolution 30/1 (The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia);
7.42. Act on its commitments in Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 including to establish transitional justice mechanisms, and to establish a clear timeline to this end (Austria);
7.43. Develop a clear timeline and benchmarks for the full implementation of Human Rights Council resolution 30/1 (Denmark);
7.44. Foster reconciliation through accelerated implementation of Human Rights Council resolution 30/1, including by launching the Office of Missing Persons, ending military involvement in civilian functions, returning lands to civilian owners, and establishing a judicial mechanism with the participation of foreign investigators, prosecutors and judges (Canada);
7.45. Fully implement the recommendations of the Consultative Task Force on Reconciliation, including to repeal the Prevention of Terrorism Act and replace it with international best practice legislation (Australia);6
7.46. Adopt a National Policy on the protection of journalists and human rights defenders to combat intimidation and violence, and to ensure effective investigation of such acts and prosecution of perpetrators (Austria);
7.47. Consider a large-scale transfer of land for civilian use in the Northern and Eastern Provinces of the country (Ghana);
7.48. Continue its efforts to ensure legal ownership and restitution to long-term internally displaced persons and refugees, as foreseen by international law standards (Holy See);
7.49. Amend or repeal Article 16 of the Constitution and amend all Personal Laws to remove discriminatory provisions against women as well as barriers to engaging in the political process (Canada);
7.50. Strengthen measures to eliminate all forms of violence against women, amongst others by criminalizing marital rape (Belgium);
7.51. Adopt specific legislation that explicitly prohibits domestic violence, including marital rape, and ensure its stringent implementation and enforcement (Slovenia);
7.52. Amend the Penal Code to decriminalise and eliminate all punitive measures related to termination of pregnancies in cases of rape, incest and severe foetal impairment (Denmark);
7.53. Take the necessary measures to establish a national procedure for the determination of the refugee status (Argentina).
8. All conclusions and/or recommendations contained in the present report reflect the position of the submitting State(s) and/or the State under review. They should not be construed as endorsed by the Working Group as a whole.
III. Voluntary pledges and commitments
9. Ensure that the ongoing constitutional reform process is inclusive, and takes into account fundamental principles of equality and non-discrimination, separation of powers, checks and balances, and the independence of the judiciary.
10. Train and appoint information officers and designated officers to all public authorities covered under the Right to Information Act to fulfill the right to information.
11. Accede to the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (OP-CAT), and designate the Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka as the national preventive and monitoring mechanism to fulfill obligations under OP-CAT.
12. Review and repeal the Prevention of Terrorism Act, and replace it with new counter-terrorism legislation compliant with international human rights standards.
13. Increase the number of and strengthen women and children’s desks of the Children and Women’s Bureau of the Sri Lanka Police to ensure a gender responsive justice system.
14. Enforce legislation guaranteeing women’s political representation at provincial and local authority levels.
15. Ensure and strengthen respect for fundamental rights of all persons, including those from the LGBTIQ community, and address concerns raised in that regard.
16. Formulate a comprehensive reparations policy to guide the granting of reparations to persons affected by the armed conflict, including internally displaced persons.
17. Ensure that all security forces personnel to be deployed in overseas peacekeeping missions are adequately vetted through a comprehensive process with the participation of the Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka.
18. Fulfill commitments contained in United Nations Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 towards the operationalisation of the Office on Missing Persons, and the establishment of a truth seeking commission, an office for reparations, and a judicial mechanism with a special counsel.
19. Work towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal of alleviating poverty through national level initiatives including the Gramashakthi People’s Movement.
20. Take measures to incorporate the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities into domestic law.
Annex
Composition of the delegation
The delegation of Sri Lanka was headed by Hon. (Dr.) Harsha de Silva, MP Deputy Minister of National Policies and Economic Affairs and composed of the following members:
Mr. Prasad Kariyawasam, Secretary to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;
H.E. Mr. Ravinatha Aryasinha, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Sri Lanka to the United Nations in Geneva;
Mr. Nerin Pulle, Deputy Solicitor General, Attorney General’s Department;
Mrs. Samantha Jayasuriya, Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka in Geneva;
Ms. Mahishini Colonne, Director General/ UN, US, Canada, Ministry of Foreign Affairs;
Ms. Chandima Wickramasinghe, Senior Assistant Secretary to the President;
Mr. Gehan Gunatilleke, Consultant to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;
Ms. Shashika Somaratne, Minister Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka in Geneva;
Ms. Mafusa Lafir, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka in Geneva;
Ms. Dulmini Dahanayake, Second Secretary, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka in Geneva;
Ms. Nethmini Medawela, Research and Coordination Assistant, Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

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