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FeaturesNewsLLRC report places govt in the dock over five issues

LLRC report places govt in the dock over five issues

 Dr. Vikramabahu Karunaratne –  The full report of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC) is in public domain, after it was presented in parliament on 16 December, by the Leader of the House, Minister Nimal Siripala de Silva. He in fact made it very certain that the recommendations would be carried out to the letter.  The report and its recommendations do not satisfy the Tamil organizations. There is no mention of war crimes, crimes against humanity and there is no mention of a need to investigate such crimes.

I agree that it is a fraud, made to satisfy the global masters. The commission worked under duress with the military chasing it every where it went. Those who came to give evidence, particularly the Tamils and Muslims, were terrorized and discouraged. In Tamil areas the military regime was openly hostile to the investigation.

The report does not reveal the truth, certainly not. It does not cover the tragedy that happened in this country. Far from it; it is a crude attempt to conceal the barbarism of the regime.

However in spite of this, Ministers Champika, Douglas and Wimal have condemned the report as unacceptable. Champika has said “We have reservations or questions of the manner in which the panel has reached certain decisions. It must be stated that the panel seems to have exceeded the limit that had been given or stipulated. They have expressed certain suggestions exceeding that limit.

The committee that was formed to look into incidents from February 2002-May 2009 has comeup with the suggestion that the solution to the North-East ethnic issue is devolution of power. That is a clear example of them exceeding their powers and limits.”

Even the commission appointed by the regime to whitewash itself, was not able to conceal some of the daring facts. Commissioners could not cover barbarism without becoming a part of it. They have struggled hard to keep their good names in civil society. Result is the anomalies spelled out in the report.

Kusal says “Despite that choice of the regime, the following five issues at least, as taken by the LLRC in its findings and recommendations, has put the government in the dock.

1. Responding to the Channel 4 programmes
 2. Armed groups in operation
 3. Heavy militarization in North – East
 4. Land disputes and alienation
 5. Devolution of powers.”

Many political analysts who are far from any sympathy to the Tamil liberation say that these recommendations will lead to a grave crisis in the government, if any attempt is made by the regime to implement these.

Can it independently investigate Channel 4 footage for authenticity and also if authentic, to take legal action to punish the culprits. Can it disarm all para military groups and withdraw the military from public life and leave civil life to a civil administration in the Tamil home land? Can it devolve power to the peripheries, giving power over land and police to the provincial council PC system

From the very beginning we have demanded reforms such as these to solve the Tamil national problem. That would have been the only method to stop the separation of the Tamil speaking people. Such autonomy would have satisfied the Tamil aspiration for self rule and preserving its identity.

Any substantial reform of that kind would have avoided all this bloodshed and destruction. Now after going through inhumanity and genocide the government commission is recommending a large step in that direction. It is a command for an about turn. The communal elements within the government such as Champika have given the sign for putting on armour for the coming battle.

Are we gong back to the days of 88/89, when we battled with arms in hand with the chauvinist who opposed devolution and equality? It is clear there cannot be any democracy or civil society in this country unless we battle out and resolve the Tamil national problem. It is very necessary for the left and the democracy to stand together for the implementation of the LLRC recommendations.

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